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Thread: George Wood - after removing the stop rail

  1. #41
    pp Pianissimo nutmegct's Avatar
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    I'm continuing "improvements" on the sub systems as I search for Divine Inspiration on the bellows/foundation disaster.

    When I clean the interior wood pieces, I vacuum, then use a wet cloth, allow to dry, then sand any discolored or rough spots.

    Should there be any kind of finish put on those surfaces? Or just leave them raw wood?

    IMG_0299.jpg

    IMG_0298.jpg

    IMG_0300[1].jpg

    Thanks.
    Tom M.

  2. #42
    pp Pianissimo nutmegct's Avatar
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    A local cabinet maker is considering whether to help me in the foundation/bellows project. He asks:

    1. Why does the surface have two "levels"? In other words, why isn't the board flat? (see photo)

    2. What is the purpose of that thick square with the hole, which is above one of the "regular" air holes? All the other air holes are at the level of the board.

    3. Why is the board made of several types of wood joined together? Why not just make a new board out of a single piece of pine, or spruce, or ... ?

    We can obviously make a new board, cut the expansion slots and the air holes, and add a raised border with leather seal. But the "two levels" of the board, and that single "block with a hole" - we don't know why they exist.


    IMG_0302.jpg

  3. #43
    ff Fortissimo SubBase's Avatar
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    Hi,
    You can replace the thinner portion of the board with a single piece of plywood, and eliminate the need for expansion joints. Baltic birch ply is the best for this, not a big box store construction plywood. The perimeter strips of wood need to go back exactly as they are. The bored-out block of wood too. The holes need to be drilled with cabinetmaker's precision so the action sits in the same relation to the cabinet.

  4. #44
    pp Pianissimo nutmegct's Avatar
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    Thanks Casey. When you say holes need to be drilled with precision, I assume you mean the screw holes, not the air holes.

    On the bellows back, there appear to be recently-added hinges, on added wooden strips nailed into the board - see photo:

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/YdrSRgGwicbv7bHC7

    Were those two smaller bellows originally held by metal hinges? or by leather hinges?

    (In other words, should I continue to use those poorly-added metal hinges, or return to leather?)

    Thanks.
    Tom M.

  5. #45
    ff Fortissimo SubBase's Avatar
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    When you take the leather hinge covering off, you will see how the hinge was constructed with cloth. I recommend canvas, but denim can work if you orient the direction of its stretch correctly.

  6. #46
    ff Fortissimo Organfella's Avatar
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    Bookbinders linen works well too, if you can source some. Denim seems the least costly - just don't cut up your dear lady's to get it...

    Nico
    "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

  7. #47
    pp Pianissimo nutmegct's Avatar
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    A bit of progress on the bellows situation.

    I cut some 1/2" birch plywood to match the old bellows board, then cut 5/8" poplar strips to use as the raised edges.

    IMG_0305.jpg

    (Rotate the photo)

    I've never done this kind of wood work before, so am still working on how to cut out the area which gives space for some of the pallets (?). That cut out will be covered with another square of plywood. Also need to cut the air holes in the board.

    On the original bellows board, the edges have leather on top. I'll put thin leather on the top of the new edges.
    Should there also be some kind of leather or other gasket material between the board itself and the four edge strips? Or is that just simply glued?

    There was no way I could figure out how to remove the broken and slivered wood which was yellow glued to the top of the bellows, so I slowly chipped it away using a wood chisel. That leaves a very rough surface, which I need to figure out how to smooth, so it will make good contact with the bellows board.

    IMG_0306.jpg

    I continue to clean the reed boxes. On the one which connects to the Concert Flute, Celeste, Tremolo, and Forte stop knobs, I found several reed cells with dry mouse poop inside. Vacuumed that out, but one cell had what seemed to be "mouse poop concrete" - a grey powder which I had to chip out with a tiny screwdriver.

    That Tremolo box is unusual to me - not a rotating fan blade as I had expected. It's like a lead weight on a wire, free to move up and down. Have no idea how it works.

    Tom M.

  8. #48
    pp Pianissimo nutmegct's Avatar
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    Earth calling members. Earth calling members. Is anyone out there?

  9. #49
    ff Fortissimo SubBase's Avatar
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    Sorry, I missed your post of the 13th, thought I'd already read one that day.
    The perimeter strips to add thickness to the ply can be glued and screwed down to be perfectly airtight. Pilot drill all the holes so it fits snug. Then the strips get a leather gasket to seal with their mating board of the upper action. Also pilot drill the new screw holes in the perimeter. Then punch or burn the leather for the screw holes, or it will pile up when the screws go through and get in the way of a nice seal.

    The bellows unit gets scraped or planed clean of all the wood and glue, then use a leather gasket on it too. Don't forget to cut the holes in the leather so the air can pass.
    You have what is called a "beater" tremolo. It has a disagreeable effect to modern ears. It works by alternately cutting off and restoring the wind supply to the reeds, like clapping your hand over your mouth.
    Casey

  10. #50
    ff Fortissimo Organfella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubBase View Post

    You have what is called a "beater" tremolo. It has a disagreeable effect to modern ears. It works by alternately cutting off and restoring the wind supply to the reeds, like clapping your hand over your mouth.
    Casey
    My massive old Jilles van der Tak has one of those. The sensitivity is controlled by a weight on a short piece of spring wire holding the valve tight - and it is a real devil to adjust properly! If the weight is too far out on the wire, the valve does not open, too far inward and the tremolo sounds like a squeeky mouse trapped in a condensed milk tin... Properly adjusted it produces an interesting effect (to older ears).

    You're doing fine Tom, and thanks for keeping us updated.

    Take care

    Nico
    "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

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