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Thread: Introduction and Advice on Purchasing a Reed Organ

  1. #51
    ppp Pianississmo ColoradoJoshua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubBase View Post
    Presley's book is rife with bad practices, like contact cement for bellows work. Nitrocellulose lacquer for refinishing, etc..
    Wherever he mentions a material or product that did not exist when the organ was built, discount it.
    Casey
    Yep, the main reason I would get it is to have a guideline on procedure, not so much the actual supplies he uses. That's one reason why it's nice to have this forum I can go to and ask about the latter. That's a good rule of thumb.

  2. #52
    ppp Pianississmo ColoradoJoshua's Avatar
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    Update #3b | Cracks!

    Over the last few weeks I've been discovering more and more that needs repaired. First and foremost, I've found a ton of large cracks in pieces of wood that are supposed to be airtight and hold a vacuum. I guess that's what I get from living in an extremely dry climate.. instead of warping I get cracking.

    First off, the foundation board (also known as the platform?) has several fairly large cracks and, of course, since it's the base for the windchest, it needs to be airtight. It's also badly warped and bowed and parts of it are splitting and starting to come apart.
    Attachment 28536
    IMG_9501.jpg IMG_9498.jpg

    Secondly, the bellows itself has multiple very large cracks in the back of it, some of which were patched at one point with an unusual kind of fabric tape that has since mostly come off.
    IMG_9512.jpg IMG_9513.jpg

    Third, the reed pan / upper part of the wind chest itself has (at least) three extremely large cracks, two of which have been patched with that old tape that is now starting to come up. The crack that hasn't been patched is so wide that you can see through it (see the picture to the left). It's a good 1/16th of an inch wide. You can also see several other cracks near the hole where the sub bass assembly sits.
    Attachment 28540 IMG_9516.jpg

    Is there a way to fix or seal these cracks in a way that will be totally airtight and won't be likely to come apart again or will I have to totally replace the pieces of wood that are cracking? It's basically guaranteed that I need to replace the foundation board though... On top of being cracked and splitting, it's so badly bowed that it's presses down on the swell lever which keeps it from even being able to move without really jamming it. What kind of wood should I use to replace it?
    Last edited by ColoradoJoshua; 01-15-2018 at 03:13 AM.

  3. #53
    Moderator myorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColoradoJoshua View Post
    First, I'm noticing that all of the other organs from this manufacturer have carpet on the pedals, but mine doesn't. I'm guessing it was so warn that the last owner removed it. I was thinking a nice plain red to match the new felt would look nice, but I'm not sure where in the world I could obtain such a thing. According to the book, the original carpet was a lot thinner than the stuff we have today. Any ideas?
    Rather than carpet, I have used some heavy upholstery material on a couple of my pump organs. I can't tell you how it will wear because it hasn't worn at all yet. I'm not sure if that's a good practice, but it's a means of getting a design on the pedals rather than plain carpet--of any color.

    For the grilles, I seem to remember my mother and one of her sisters attaching red broadcloth to the back of the grilles with some sort of glue--I don't remember what it was.

    Hope that helps, and others, please correct me if I'm off here.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

  4. #54
    ff Fortissimo SubBase's Avatar
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    2 members found this post helpful.
    I use baltic birch plywood for replacing the bottom windchest boards. Getting all the old hole locations transferred perfectly is nerve-wracking, even though I work to the tolerances of cabinetmaking all the time.
    If the soundboard splits are wide enough, fit pieces of veneer into them. If not that wide, fix them when you have suction; pull yellow glue (Titebond II) into them. It has enough gap-filling ability for this. Avoid the valve seating area; don't glue down the valve leather inadvertently. You can use a glue spatula for those tight quarters.
    A shopvac works in lieu of having the bellows connected; hold the nozzle underneath and apply glue from the top. Wipe up the excess of course.
    Last edited by SubBase; 01-15-2018 at 03:38 PM.

  5. #55
    ff Fortissimo Silken Path's Avatar
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    I've read that small cracks can be sealed with strips of bellows material and hide glue. That's what the Kimball factory did. Of course, Casey's advice is a hundred years better.
    -- I'm Lamar -- 1967 Allen TC-4 Project (forum thread)
    -- 1899 Kimball Parlor Organ (forum thread)
    -- 1999 Rodgers W5000C and Hauptwerk - spare W5000C for spares
    -- Conn 643 Theater - Hammond M3 and E-112 - Roland RD300nx stage piano
    -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

  6. #56
    Moderator myorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubBase View Post
    If the soundboard splits are wide enough, fit pieces of veneer into them. If not that wide, fix them when you have suction; pull yellow glue (Titebond II) into them. It has enough gap-filling ability for this. Avoid the valves eating area; don't glue down the valve leather inadvertently. You can use a glue spatula for those tight quarters.
    Casey,

    In a matter of months, I'll have a space to begin working on the pump organs I have that don't work well. I've often wondered if there was a way to inject glue into various cracks--like a syringe. Or, is the viscosity of the glue too thick to use a syringe? If so, where would someone find something like that? I've often thought it would allow for more precise delivery of the glue and create less of a mess.

    What think ye?

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

  7. #57
    ff Fortissimo SubBase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silken Path View Post
    I've read that small cracks can be sealed with strips of bellows material and hide glue. That's what the Kimball factory did. Of course, Casey's advice is a hundred years better.
    I prefer making the soundboard solid again if possible, because it should vibrate and move as one. A leather strip is pneumatically effective, but may have some unknowable effect on the acoustic property.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by myorgan View Post
    Casey,

    In a matter of months, I'll have a space to begin working on the pump organs I have that don't work well. I've often wondered if there was a way to inject glue into various cracks--like a syringe. Or, is the viscosity of the glue too thick to use a syringe? If so, where would someone find something like that? I've often thought it would allow for more precise delivery of the glue and create less of a mess.

    What think ye?

    Michael
    I like the bellows-effected technique best for getting the glue into a crack. You need two things, glue and a rag/sponge to clean up.
    Casey

  8. #58
    ppp Pianississmo ColoradoJoshua's Avatar
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    Quick question:

    I've heard of using an ultrasonic cleaner to clean reeds. What kind of solution is best to use in said ultrasonic cleaner and how long should they sit cleaning? Is the method shown in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7g20850Z8M) adequate or is there a better way?

  9. #59
    ff Fortissimo Silken Path's Avatar
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    1 members found this post helpful.
    Hi, Josh. I used one. Casey suggested using watch cleaning fluid. I discussed it in my famous Kimball thread. Please look here:

    http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...or-Organ/page4
    -- I'm Lamar -- 1967 Allen TC-4 Project (forum thread)
    -- 1899 Kimball Parlor Organ (forum thread)
    -- 1999 Rodgers W5000C and Hauptwerk - spare W5000C for spares
    -- Conn 643 Theater - Hammond M3 and E-112 - Roland RD300nx stage piano
    -- Public domain hymn search: https://songselect.ccli.com/search/r...t=publicdomain

  10. #60
    ppp Pianississmo ColoradoJoshua's Avatar
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    Update #4

    Sorry for the long delay since my last post! Life has happened and I haven't gotten the chance to get to the organ much since March. However, yesterday I was able to pick up some supplies and today I spent the late morning and early afternoon working on touching up the stoprail. It's far from perfect, but it's a huge improvement on what it was before. I didn't want to go to the effort of refinishing it yet because of time and the sheer amount of work involved, so as long as it's presentable, I'm happy. (also getting a replacement Hinners decal would be easier said than done)

    Here are some before and after pictures, albeit not very good.

    IMG_2566.jpg
    ^ Before

    IMG_0834.jpg
    ^ After

    IMG_2563.jpg
    ^ Before

    IMG_0836.jpg
    IMG_0837.jpg
    ^ After

    What I ended up doing to cover the big problems was filling a couple holes with wood filler, painting over the bare wood with semi-gloss paint, and then using an ebony stain marker over that to get back the deep black and the shine. I simply went over all the scrapes and scratches with the stain marker to cover them up. The difference is night and day so at least it's presentable now. Maybe one day I'll go to the work of refinishing it totally, but right now I just don't have time.

    I'm planning on making a video about the stop action specifically and hopefully you'll be able to see the difference better in that when it comes out.

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