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Thread: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3

  1. #1

    Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    Hello,</P>


    I recently bought an M3 at an estate sale and would like to hook it up to a Leslie 122 that I picked up at an auction this summer. Is the 6122 connector kit pretty much the only way to go? I've seen references on the internet to an 8010 connector kit, but I assume this is something that is no longer available. </P>


    I would like to have half moon switches If possible, but is the only way I can get them by doing something like this with a 147 kit?</P>


    http://www.captain-foldback.com/Leslie_sub/tips.htm</P>


    Also,</P>


    Once I do get the Leslie hookup figured out, Is it possible to play a guitar or send vocals through the phono input on the Hammond amp to get to the Leslie? I've heard of people getting shocked by their guitars in some scenario, and would like to avoid that if possible. Thanks.</P>

  2. #2

    Re: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    What about modifying the 6122 kit to use older style half-moon switches? How hard would that be?</p>

    Anybody on here running their M3 through a 122? What setup are you using?</p>

    Thanks.
    </p>

  3. #3
    Junior Member everiman's Avatar
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    Re: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    Yes, I am using a 6122 kit with old style half moon switches, however the main ensemble echo will give you 'ensemble' at the main setting as well unless you change the original wiring. I haven't fixed mine yet, another list member gave me the wiring diagram. It's not a big deal anyway, unplugging the leslie will do the same thing. </p>

    The 6122 kit is pretty cheesy about 50 cents worth of parts. It also exposes line voltage when the organ is switched on, not very safe, especially if you have small kids or pets who can access the back of the organ.
    </p>

  4. #4
    Junior Member Dave S.'s Avatar
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    Re: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    It can be done, even though the 122 wasn't really meant to be used with a single-ended output like on the M3. Using a converted26-1 kitwould ensure that the backsides of your plugs aren't exposed, like what everiman was saying. All you're really doing is making an 8000 kit out of the 26-1 kit with the addition of the transformer.</P>


    For other options,reproduction 8000 kits and 1/2 moon switches can still be obtained from places like bborgan.com or goffprof.com. I tend to like those better than the 6122 kits myself, especially since those switches that come with the 6122's are just ergonomically disastrous. Many places that deal in vintage Hammondsmay have the echo/ensemble kits and switches stashed up in boxes; there were literally piles of the "3M" kits at B3 World when I worked there, and usually a few switches in nice shape. (just tossing out examples here, I know there's quite a few more places you could inquire with)</P>


    Or,if you find a good 147 amp, swap itinto your 122 cabinet and use the 26-1 kit as it's intended. </P>


    As far as using the inputs on the preamp, I tried plugging a Gibson SG into it once, sounded awful. Maybe there's a way to clean it up, someone else would have to chime in since i've never pursued using those. </P>

  5. #5
    Senior Member tonewheel1966's Avatar
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    Re: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    Hi</P>


    You need the 8010 kit for M3,M100,L100. When I bought my Leslie 122R it came with this kit that had been used on a Yamaha B10 R?! If you want pdf instructions for this them PM me. I used the kit on my L100 until the RT3 came along. It took half an hour to hook the 122R up to the L100.</P>


    Cheers</P>


    Dave</P>
    <P mce_keep="true"></P>
    <P mce_keep="true"></P>

  6. #6

    Re: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    What kind of modifications would I have to do to a reproduction 8000 kit to make it work with the M3? From the manuals I've seen online, I haven't see any mention of using the kit with a G.G. terminal-less spinet.</p>

    Thanks for the input so far.</p>

    Someone local suggested I install a 1/4" line out and use a Trek II preamp pedal. Any thoughts on this method?
    </p>

    http://www.trekii.com/UC1A.html</p>

  7. #7

    Help: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    Here it is a year later, and I've finally reached the point where I'm ready to hook the 122 to the M3. I ended up modifying a 26-1 kit per the instructions on Captain Foldback's site: http://www.captain-foldback.com/ (it's the first tip in the Leslie tech tips from captain foldback section) but have run into a little snag. The 26-1 kit I started with had no console adapter so I made my own using a 5 pin amphenol connecter with the intention of splicing the other ends into the harness of the organ. I found my information on the console adapter used with the 26-1 box at the Fish Organs website:
    </p>

    http://www.fishorgans.com/leslie_kits/007271_kit_for_Hammond.pdf</p>

    If I read the M1/M2 section of the instructions, it makes sense to me: the green wire from the amp is the signal that I break into with the kit and the black wire is the ground.</p>

    When I look at the schematic for the console adapter used for an M3, I get a little confused. My green wire comes out of terminal 1 on the little 5-pin connector at the amp and the black wire comes out of terminal 3. There are no other wires as this is a PM speaker M3. According to the diagram in the 7271 kit instructions it looks as if the P1 connector of the console adapter would connect terminal 1 of the amp to terminal 1 of S2 at the 26-1 box which is supposed to be ground.</p>

    Is the color convention reversed between the M1/M2 and the M3 or am I missing something?
    </p>

  8. #8

    Re: Help: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    Well, I went ahead and wired it up with the green wire as the signal and the black wire as ground. Everything worked fine for the first twenty minutes.</p>

    The halfmoon switches switched as they should, I had both rotor speeds and sound was coming out of the Leslie. The only issues were a noisy upper rotor fast motor (needs oiling) and possibly a slight loss of volume in the organ-speaker-only configuration compared to the levels I saw before I put in the Leslie hook up. the Leslie amp smelled a little hot, but I thought it might be some of the dust cooking off.</p>

    Then...disaster. Acrid smoke started rolling out of the bottom side louvers as the big capacitor on top of the amp emptied it's contents. I rushed and cut the power to everything. The organ seems to be fine....the Leslie, not so much. </p>

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44554970@N03/4253181314/</p>

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44554970@N03/4252410783/</p>

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/44554970@N03/4252410853/</p>

    Could I have fried the cap with something I did with the hookup or do these caps sometimes just blow on their own? I bought the Leslie for $10 at the auction for a tiki restaurant that was closing, and I honestly had no idea if it was going to work in the first place. The Leslie is a 1973 model and had been collecting dust for quite awhile.
    </p>

  9. #9

    Re: Help: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3

    Anyone smoked a Leslie before? I realize I probably need to call the local Hammond Tech at this point, but thought maybe someone on here might have some insight as to what just went down.

  10. #10
    Senior Member jimmywilliams's Avatar
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    Re: Help: Connecting a Leslie 122 to my M3



    If you are talking about the large filter capacitor can ... old ones can indeed blow up, especially if the equipment has sat around for years without being powered on. You can order replacements.. You should really re-cap the entire Leslie amp. There are kits you can buy to do a complete recapping job. The problem is, when filter caps go down there is a chance that serious damage to the power transformer can also follow. The cheapest thing to do would be to order new cans and hope for the best. But if you keep having problems you have to take it to a pro - unless you are comfortable doing this type of work yourself. These things are high voltage and too dangerous to fool around with. You got the Leslie dirt cheap so invest whatever you need into it - especially for your own safety. Come to think of it, it would be a wise investment to get it processionally serviced from the ground up, especially since more damage may have cascaded through other parts of the amp. Once restored and working correctly, it shouldn't give you any problems for a long time ..and you can enjoy using it instead of tinkering with it or worrying about another near-disaster. Regarding your overall question ... if it was functioning properly before the incident, I am guessing that it was not the hookup wiring that caused the problem but I can't say for sure. If you started hearing very loud humming before the incident that is a sign of filter caps going bad. If you ever hear loud humming with any equipment like this, turn it off immediately before you have real trouble .... you now see what can happen. Good luck with your Leslie. </P>


    - jim</P>
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    Jimmy Williams
    Hobbyist (organist/technician)
    Gulbransen Model D with Leslie 204
    Farfisa Compact / Leslie 860 and Combo Preamp III / Hammond Porta-B

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