Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Leslie amphenol connector

  1. #1
    Newbie ptbuzzcut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Philadelphia area
    Posts
    20


    Leslie amphenol connector



    Can anyone tell me how to solder the wires into the pins on an amphenol connector (male)? How do you get the solder down in the pin. I have looked at existing ones and see noresidue around the opening so I can't figure out how to solder wires into a new one.</p>

    Thanks
    </p>

  2. #2
    Senior Member geoelectro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    3,181


    Re: Leslie amphenol connector



    Interesting that I just did one of those today. You want to run the wires through the pins with some extra hanging out. You want to position the plug with the pins up. It needs to be secure. The main thing is a hot iron, and that you heat BOTH the wire and the pin. I use a 33 watt pencil iron which is hotter than the typical iron. In order to get the solder to flow down the pin, the pin must be hot enough to melt solder.</p>

    I heat the wire and pin together while applying solder to the joint. Touching the iron, wire and pin together. Once the pin is hot enough to melt the solder, I apply enough solder to fill the opening of the pin. Then, remove the heat. The solder will fall down into the pin somewhat. If it falls to far, just repeat the process until you gat the result you want.</p>

    Once the wires are soldered, take some side cutters and cut off the excess wire. You can use a wire brush to clean up. If any solder gets onto the outside of the pin, you will have to remove it. A sharp knife or small file. Best to avoid this if possible.</p>

    This really takes practice. I have soldered for over 35 years and frankly never thought of trying to describe the process in print. Hope this helps!</p>

    George
    </p>

  3. #3
    Junior Member everiman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    103


    Re: Leslie amphenol connector



    I would do it slightly differently, I use a 100 watt gun type soldering iron. Also make sure you are using *rosin flux core* solder. If it is a used amphenol plug you are soldering, make sure you remove the remains of old wire and solder. There should be a visible hole at the end of the pin, the pin is hollow, you should be able to insert the new wire all the way through. </p>

    To remove old solder grasp plug with pliers, heat the pin until solder runs like water and quickly give it a shake. (Careful of direction of flying hot solder natch). Strip new wire, give the strands a 1/4 twist to hold them together. <span style="text-decoration: underline; font-weight: bold;">Tin</span> the stripped end of the wire by applying the soldering iron to the bare strand and applying solder to the opposite side, so that the wire, not the soldering iron, melts the solder. When you are done the bare part of the wire will be coated with solder. </p>

    Insert the tinned wire into the pin until it is visible at the end or poking through slightly. Hold the plug level (pins parallel to the ground) Heat pin about halfway back with soldering iron, and apply solder to tip. It should run like water, heat capillary action will suck the solder inside the pin, keep gravity out of it. You do not want much or any solder on the outside of the pin, you want it inside forming a solid bond between pin and wire. </p>

    Remove heat, the holes at each end should be filled with solder. If you did it right the solder will have filled the inside without blobbing the outside so much it won't fit into the socket. Excess solder on the outside of the pin can be removed by heating and shaking (making sure you don't shake the wire out) or by heating and quickly wiping with a small wet sponge. Watch your fingers.
    </p>

    The 100 watt soldering gun is needed for this operation because you have a largish pin and lots of solder to heat. This type of iron is no longer used because of the danger of overheating or zapping delicate solid state electronics. However for tube amps or electro-mechanical wiring its da bomb. Lots of heat very quickly. I think you can still buy em new, but flea markets and garage sales will have plenty to choose from. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldering_gun </p>

    In a pinch bare 12 or 14 ga solid copper wire ca be used for a tip, just bend it to the same shape as a store bought tip.
    </p>

  4. #4
    Senior Member Wes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Inverary, ON, Canada
    Posts
    4,325


    I know this is an old thread, but ... Thanks, George. I've been soldering for a long time, and looked at one of those connectors for the first time last night and gave it the big old WTF?!

    I did pretty much as you described. I found it easiest to strip/feed one wire into the plug at a time, unlike when I do a female. I get the wire to come out the end, nip it off, and let it recefr about 1/32" so that it's basically flush before I put the solder to it.

    The real key here is a hot iron (I used a WES-51 on full) and letting the solder "wick in" to the wire. No sloppy work will do here. I also used a fairly thick solder (16 or 18 AWG). The only trouble I had, besides needing to pick off some dried flux with my thumbnail, was forgetting to put the hood on before making the first connection, *sigh*.

    Unsoldering is just a matter of heating up the pin and pulling the wire; clearing the channel can be done simply by dropping the connector straight down onto the work bench when the solder is still flowing.

    leslie-plug.jpg

  5. #5
    Sweet Pete
    Guest Sweet Pete's Avatar


    Great description guys!Those male amphenol plugs can really be a PITA first time you try.And Wes......a WES-51 will get the job done alright,I change the tip to a larger one for this type of work.
    Heating up the pins is essential to do this properly!I use soldering paste as well.Modern solder doesn't have enough flux.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Inverary, ON, Canada
    Posts
    4,325


    "Modern solder doesn't have enough flux."

    Maybe this is why I prefer that particular roll of solder. It's Radio Shack solder from the early 1980s (Archer brand). Maybe even the late 1970s. As you can see from the photo, I'm almost out and kinda sad about that.

    FWIW I used a 1/8" iron-clad chisel tip (IIRC) on the iron -- this is the tip I use for just about everything. Love that WES-51. No more overheated parts due to low soldering temperatures and/or poor heat transfer like my old $10 irons.

    Wes

  7. #7
    Sweet Pete
    Guest Sweet Pete's Avatar


    Got My WES-51 last year,and got the $20 mail in rebate.........best $80 I've spent on repairs in years.No more overheated components is right!I reworked all the solder joints on a 122 that I shipped away on the 'Kon-Tiki',it had been submerged in the Cumberland River,when Nashville flooded a few years back.......Brendon will soon find out he has a very LOUD 122.....LOL.....Murph was going to throw the chassis in the dumpster.That soldering station really helped out with my projects.

  8. #8
    Member MihevicB3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Medina, Ohio
    Posts
    359


    Quote Originally Posted by Wes View Post
    "Modern solder doesn't have enough flux."

    Maybe this is why I prefer that particular roll of solder. It's Radio Shack solder from the early 1980s (Archer brand). Maybe even the late 1970s. As you can see from the photo, I'm almost out and kinda sad about that.

    Wes
    I've used Ersin Multicore for years. It has plenty of flux since it has 5 cores of rosin flux. It is a 60/40 tin/lead solder and is still available. It is now made by Loctite. It is available from Newark Electronics. The Newark stock # is 38C1598. I bought some last year. I checked the part # and it is still available.

    John M.

    P.S. It came in a special box very well labeled as Hazardous Material
    1956 Hammond B3
    1963 Leslie 122
    Two Pr40ís
    One JR-20 (for fluid reverb signal)
    Hamptone LEQ3B
    Trek II Reverb
    Trek II String Bass

  9. #9
    Senior Member torea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    There, CA
    Posts
    2,052


    I use 60/40 stuff from American Terminal. It's the one that pops up near the top on Amazon. Works well enough for me. Once you get the trick of soldering the pins down, it's very easy. Just make sure to keep the entire pin hot for the duration, otherwise the solder will pour back out and you have to clean it up or the pin won't fit in the socket.

    What I usually do for soldering to a plug for the first time is to get the wire up there (I don't usually tin it since sometimes that makes it too fat, I get too much solder sometimes). Once it's in position with my holding-hands thing, I put my iron's tip over the top of the open pin. Once the little bit of solder on the iron starts to go into the pin, I move the iron to the side of the pin and push my thread of solder into the top of the pin. Once it seems like there's enough in there, I let it cool then use the iron to clean up the outside of the pin when needed.

    To clear out the old/used plugs, I use one of those solder sucker tubes. If yours is poorly designed like mine, you have to wait a little while before sucking. Mine has a metal rod inside and if you don't wait a second, the ton of solder sticks to the rod (such a dumb design!). You'd then have to disassemble the sucker and clean the solder out. Anyway, I put my iron on the top of the pin for a second or two, and once the solder starts to come out, I move the iron away and suck it up. Sometimes I pull the wire out before doing that, sometimes I wait until I've cleaned some of the solder out. The reason being that I've had solder come with the wire and stick to the back of the plug, then I burnt the plug cleaning it up. Looked terrible.


    My three cents
    Keyboards: 1972 Fender Rhodes Stage 73, M-111, M-3, A-100, M2 Desk(!), B3!
    Spinny things: Wurlitzer Tone Cabs (500 and 420), PR-40, 31W, 31H, chopped 31H, 125 (empty cabinet), 30A!!!

    Looking to Sell: M-111 and M3. M3 is like new body, plays great aside from a few small things. M-111 is a little worn but plays great!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Inverary, ON, Canada
    Posts
    4,325


    John - thanks for pointing out that the multicore stuff exists. It could be expensive to get here, but if I don't find the current local offerings to be acceptable, I may just order some on payday.... I can probably amortize the expense at $2/yr

    BTW, any thoughts w.r.t eutectic solder? (63/37)

    Torea - I bet we have the same solder sucker. In fact, I have never seen one which would not choke if you fed it enough solder, including the nice Velleman units with the blue body, long plunger handle, and yellow highlights. A desoldering bulb might work better for this application, but I haven't seen mine since about 1988.... But I must admit, I *do* like the "drop it in the table" method, both for efficacy and immediacy. As long as it's possible...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •