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Thread: A Prelude and fuge I composed

  1. #121
    pp Pianissimo Eddy67716's Avatar
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    Okay,
    I think I understand more about counterpoint;
    but what are the things I'm not getting about harmony, and WHAT ARE 6/4 CHORDS? I can't find anything about them.

  2. #122
    Moderator andyg's Avatar
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    Haven't had time to read through the thread, but I'm assuming that the 6/4 chords are from figured bass? If so, and you don't understand the term, you should, so look it up and learn what it is.
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  3. #123
    f Forte regeron's Avatar
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    A couple observations:

    - It's interesting that you want to write a fugue for 2017 (not 1730), yet the only fugues you have looked at or listened to were written before 1750.

    - Your incorrect registration indications demonstrate your lack of understanding of organ stops, yet I don't see any move on your part to learn more about their proper use.

    - You say you had started to learn harmony, but your piano teacher suggested that you not continue until college. That isn't right. You need to be learning now, bit by bit.

    - Writing fugues is not a 'first step' in composing. It's the culmination of a study of harmony and counterpoint. You're making life very hard (impossible?) for yourself by not learning those subjects first.

  4. #124
    f Forte regeron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddy67716 View Post
    Okay,
    I think I understand more about counterpoint;
    but what are the things I'm not getting about harmony, and WHAT ARE 6/4 CHORDS? I can't find anything about them.
    This comment says more than you think.

    - If you re-read this thread, there are lots of suggestions of what you're "not getting about harmony."
    - 6/4 chords are chords (triads, to be exact) in second inversion. If you had studied harmony, you would have knowm that. I googled "6/4 chords". There's LOTS of information about them, and though there might be different spellings ("6-4" or "six-four"), any harmony text that is worth anything would have information about them.

    It's all quite simple:
    - You can't build a house if you can't tell the difference between a hammer and a saw.
    - You can't bake a cake if you can't tell the difference between sugar and salt.
    - You can't write a fugue if you don't understand harmony and counterpoint.

    And for what it's worth, don't get caught in the trap of speed. A "bat-out-of-hell" tempo is not a pre-requisite for writing a fugue. Then again, so far it only serves to show that you're trying to write something that you don't understand.

  5. #125
    p Piano andijah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddy67716 View Post
    Before I take this too far,

    Is this what you meant by simple and are there any errors I need to correct before I take this too far?
    Yes, this is simpler than a four-part-fugue.
    However, yes, there are quite a few errors in there (examples: what's that c# doing in bar no. 7? why would you jump from c to d' in bar 11/12? Why does the piece end where it ends?)

    But: you're received very sound advice in this thread. You don't have to listen to this advice, but... if I were you, I would.

    Earlier I said you should let go of this one particular fugue. I might take this one step further today. Let go of fugues for the time being. Start by writing a nice melody line, then find a good bass line for it, and then you can start filling in the middle voices, doing classical or progressive harmony, whatever you like. You will find that this is challenging enough. And once you've understood this (and know what a 6/4 chord is and when and how to use it), go back to those fugues if they're what you want to do.

    I'll tell you something, though. I spent four years at music college, got my diploma and all that, but I haven't written a fugue yet. Not because I don't know how to do it, but because it's really hard work and I rather spend time playing fugues by other composers and concentrate on what I write well, e.g. preludes and hymn settings.

    You're free to do whatever you want, but if you want fellow musicians to play and enjoy your works, you need to learn the language (and later maybe the dialects) and, sorry to be so frank, you should've spotted that c# before uploading the page. This is a major error that just shouldn't happen to a musician.
    Last edited by andijah; 10-28-2017 at 08:42 PM.

  6. #126
    pp Pianissimo Eddy67716's Avatar
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    I have read all these tutorials on harmony.
    http://www.musicawareness.com/Tutorial3.html

    I think I might do some experimenting on chords. I now know some rules about using what chords when, I also have leaned that melodies should always start with a note from the tonic triad and will always in on the tonic or the third. It should be singable and it should be constrained to an octave.

  7. #127
    pp Pianissimo Eddy67716's Avatar
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    This is a harmony test in chords I did.
    I'm doing this to perfect harmony. Once I do that I will move on to perfecting counterpoint.

    Chord harmony test.pdf
    Chord harmony test.mp3

  8. #128
    p Piano andijah's Avatar
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    What do you mean by harmony test?
    For me, the chord progressions in the pdf don't make sense.

    Sorry, I don't seem to be of any help here. But I'm trying to understand where you want to go and just don't see it. Maybe it's me.

  9. #129
    pp Pianissimo Eddy67716's Avatar
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    I've just realised that this this piece of music from my new Mario game is almost a fugue. (The subject appears twice in the tonic key (F minor) in the alto and soprano voices The pedal has a similar base pattern on the first two subject lines and then the subject answered in C sharp minor in the pedals and the tenor and then it has a coda. It's probably just a synthesized organ voice but is that a seventeenth 1 3/5 (Diapason) mutation I hear giving that song a tierce like quality?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lr_1BXwVtOo

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