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Thread: hammond oil

  1. #1

    hammond oil

    i know this must have been asked a 100 times already but heres my query i think hammond oil i sway overpriced ,what is wrong with using a good quality clock oil.the bearings on a hammond are certainly similar.thank you all for your replies re the h100.mike edwards.

  2. #2
    Member handyczech's Avatar
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    Opinions and facts will fly. Turbine oil is said to be chemically acceptable. There are components in various convenience oils which can cause changes in the metals used in the generators or cause gumming and clogging on the hundreds of cotton thread wicks which conduct the oil. Uless you are considering bathing in it, a few drops or spoons of the real thing is not that expensive considering the consequences.
    Larry K
    Bolingbrook, il

    Hammond Colonnade, Aurora Custom, Digital Piano for now
    Retired: Hammond L-102, M-3, S-6, H-112, B-2+21H+PR-40, B-3+21H.

  3. #3
    Member ShadyJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by handyczech View Post
    UNless you are considering bathing in it, a few drops or spoons of the real thing is not that expensive considering the consequences.
    Larry has nicely summed up the discussions that have occurred on this forum. There are legitimate reasons why some oils are definitely bad for the organ. We know Hammond oil works. You could spent a few bucks for some Hammond oil that will last a few years for a product you know will work or you could risk saving some money and hope the product works. There may be other products that work too but it's not worth me spending an hour or two to save maybe $10 buying a product I hope will work. My Hammond organ is worth more than that and I know the proper oil will help avoid a problem.
    When I become dictator, those who preach intolerance will not be tolerated.

  4. #4

    I have heard it reasoned that since Laurens Hammond was a clockmaker (a horologist, I think is the word...) that he probably DID use clock oil. I'm not saying he actually did, by the way. You'd have to look up the data sheets of both oils to know.

    Besides, any kind of oil sold in small quantities for specific purposes is bound to cost.
    Where would you find clock oil? I've got a mantle clock that might be due a servicing....
    I guess I could use Hammond oil!

    But seriously, when we first got our C3 we called a tech. Because Hammond oil isn't locally available he dosed us up with this stuff:


    Later when I had to replace a broken key I also ordered a bottle of TG oil from Rick at TonewheelGeneral... and the Hammond oil was actually cheaper than this stuff the tech picked up for us from the music store!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Singer sewing oil and light zoomspout turbine oil have been verified as AOK by well known techs, that's all I can safely say....
    -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101- -1967ish Leslie 122-
    -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)- -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-

    -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)- -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp-
    -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

  5. #5
    Senior Member jkrusel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendon Wright View Post
    I have heard it reasoned that since Laurens Hammond was a clockmaker (a horologist, I think is the word...) that he probably DID use clock oil. I'm not saying he actually did, by the way. You'd have to look up the data sheets of both oils to know.

    Besides, any kind of oil sold in small quantities for specific purposes is bound to cost.
    Where would you find clock oil? I've got a mantle clock that might be due a servicing....
    I guess I could use Hammond oil!

    But seriously, when we first got our C3 we called a tech. Because Hammond oil isn't locally available he dosed us up with this stuff:


    Later when I had to replace a broken key I also ordered a bottle of TG oil from Rick at TonewheelGeneral... and the Hammond oil was actually cheaper than this stuff the tech picked up for us from the music store!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Singer sewing oil and light zoomspout turbine oil have been verified as AOK by well known techs, that's all I can safely say....
    I agree that a good clock lubricant is great for the actual bearings in a Hammond TWG. Problem is the delivery of the oil through the exquisite scheme that Hammond cooked up using cotton threads. The oil has to stay fluid enough to actually get down to the bushings through the threads, and not gunk up the threads, or gunk up the trough up on top. Light turbine oil seems to do the trick! BTW, I don't think I would want to use Singer sewing machine oil as a usual lubricant - maybe to get a stuck TWG going, but I'd want it flushed out eventually with Hammond oil or light turbine oil.

    WARNING: Totally subjective comment coming, re: Singer sewing machine oil. It smells! There is something in there that is not in Hammond oil (NO smell). I don't want it in MY TG.
    Jerry in Leslie, spinning around trying to find my way

    1990 Korg M1 - moved on to a new life
    1981 Lowrey MX-1 - giant box of bad connections
    1975 Lowrey TGS - gathering dust
    1973 Hammond T-524C w/mods - fun machine!
    1972 Hammond XTP - moved on
    1971 Gulbransen Premiere PR (1154) - awesome sound!
    1965 Hammond E-133 w/mods - her name is Emmanuele, and we are in love

  6. #6

    Wait, a tech gave you the Al Cass stuff? I have that for my euphonium! In fact, our school's band room is littered with those bottles. Did it work well? I'll spring for the real thing when my first annual oiling comes around in july (I've had the organ less than a year and bought it freshly oiled), but I'm wondering out of curiosity.

  7. #7
    Member wagonman76's Avatar
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    Whatever oil you use, it needs to have the following characteristics from everything I've read.

    1. Needs to be the proper viscosity. Thick enough to actually do some good, but thin enough to not bog down the bearings.

    2. Needs to be formulated to not gum up the cotton threads either when wet, or after it dries out.

    3. Needs to have zero metallic additives such as zinc, since this will eventually accumulate deposits of dendrites or whatever they are called.

    You could spend hours or days researching oils and hope you are right. I've looked around myself every now and then and it seems to be a tough combination to find.

    Or just get the Hammond oil and be done with it. Mine is good for about a year but when the time rolls around I'll just get the stuff. $10 for a yearly oiling, I can come up with that. Other instruments cost more in yearly maintenance than that. You change guitar strings, etc.
    1970 Hammond T422 (for me)
    1966 Hammond L112 (for my daughter)
    1980 Kimball M75 Temptation (parts only), 1980 Kimball M70 Temptation (parts only)
    1965 Hammond L112 (probably for parts), Magnus Chord Organ (for kicks)

  8. #8
    Member jpmas555's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wagonman76 View Post
    Whatever oil you use, it needs to have the following characteristics from everything I've read.

    1. Needs to be the proper viscosity. Thick enough to actually do some good, but thin enough to not bog down the bearings.

    2. Needs to be formulated to not gum up the cotton threads either when wet, or after it dries out.

    3. Needs to have zero metallic additives such as zinc, since this will eventually accumulate deposits of dendrites or whatever they are called.

    You could spend hours or days researching oils and hope you are right. I've looked around myself every now and then and it seems to be a tough combination to find.

    Or just get the Hammond oil and be done with it. Mine is good for about a year but when the time rolls around I'll just get the stuff. $10 for a yearly oiling, I can come up with that. Other instruments cost more in yearly maintenance than that. You change guitar strings, etc.
    If the organ was previously oiled by any other type other than Hammond oil, can you just add Hammond oil to it? Or do you do the lighter fluid technique first?

  9. #9

    This topic has the makings of a great article for the wiki.
    -------

    Hammond S-6 #72421 currently undergoing restoration.
    Hammond M-102 #21000 and Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.

  10. #10
    Administrator Admin's Avatar
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    I agree. I stubbed out an article in the Wiki several days ago. All it needs is the content. It's here if anyone wants to become an illustrious wiki contributor.

    http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...nd:Hammond+Oil

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