Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Kimball Sensation MTS (Magic Tone Selector)

  1. #1

    Post Kimball Sensation MTS (Magic Tone Selector)

    A few months ago, I bought a Kimball Sensation Organ and have been working on fixing the few problems it had and have by and large been successful. One feature I am puzzled by is the Magic Tone Selector that selects the function the knee lever will perform. Most of the functions are self explanatory and work fine, such as pitch, rhythm stop, drum roll, razz and posthorn, but I cannot figure out what the one labeled "minor" does. I thought it might make a major chord from the auto chord section into a minor chord but as far as I can determine it does nothing. From that I assume it is not working, but it is hard to fix if you don't know what it is supposed to do. I recently obtained the service manual, but while the boards are fairly well documented, the actual physical controls do not seem to be represented on the drawings so I haven't been able to figure out anything from that. I have also looked at other Kimball manuals, but the Sensation seems to be the only one that had that function. All the others have "wood block" in place of that function.

    So, does anyone know what the "minor" function on the MTS selector is supposed to do? Thanks for any help.

    Dale Smith

  2. #2
    Moderator andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Newhaven, UK
    Posts
    8,486

    IIRC, you're right, it should produce minor chords. If it isn't, well you're not missing much unless you use 1 finger chords. If you do, then stop and learn some real ones!
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com



    Current organ: Kawai SR6 + Leslie 760 Walnut
    Retired Organs: Lots! Including Hammond T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2012 Pacemaker. Kimball something-or-other.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145, 760, 710, 415 x 2.

  3. #3

    Andy,

    I don't use 1 finger chords. They are harder to learn than doing it the right way. It appears that Kimball may have tried to group the chords is some logical sense, but didn't really succeed. Putting C and C-minor a full octave apart was really awful. I just wanted to get this organ working as originally designed. Apparently it doesn't do what it is supposed to do as to this feature, but it isn't much of a loss. I also doubt that I will use the knee lever much anyway.

    The only other thing I haven't been able to fix yet is the absence of percussive keying on the third F, (key 25). For now I am playing around it, but I need to get this fixed. I have checked for loose wires, but don't want to chance doing anything to the boards, so I will probably get a pro to check this out. Getting 6 out of 8 problems fixed isn't too bad.

    Dale

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jan Girardot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,157

    Dale, I'll bet a dollar to a donut your percussion problem on note 25 is due to a bad keyer, or a loose connection. See if you could swap that keyer with another, next door.

    . . . Jan
    the OrganGrinder

  5. #5

    Jan,

    I am assuming that by keyer, you are referring to the connection on the keyer board, in this case, the percussion sustain keyer board, not the actual connection on the keyboard. From what I have been able to determine, there is only one connection on the actual keyboard as that is all that is illustrated in the manuals. I figure that if it were something on the keyboard, that note would not work fine on all the other voices, including the non-percussive special effects, such as solo violin, brass mute, accordion and hawaiian guitar. Before I dig in, I want to make sure I fully understand what I am doing and am comfortable that it is within my competence. Thanks for helping me learn.

    Dale

  6. #6

    Since I started this thread as to the MTS selector button labeled "Minor," I thought I should complete it now that I have figured out exactly what that button does. It actually has nothing to do with the chords, automatic or otherwise, but only affects the Swinging Fingers feature. When using "Magic Chord", the button has no effect as the arpeggio played by the Swinging Fingers is based on the one finger chord selected. If it is a major chord, it plays a major arpeggio and if it is a minor chord, it plays a minor arpeggio. When using full fingered chords, the Swinging Fingers is based on the pedal depressed and only plays a major arpeggio based on that pedal's note. Here is where the knee lever option comes in. If the "Minor" button is selected, the knee lever action changes the arpeggio from a major arpeggio to a minor arpeggio.

    I don't use the one finger chords and have found the Swinging Fingers to not be very useful, so it took me a long time to figure this one out. As far as I know, The Sensation was the only Kimball organ to employ this feature. Most other organs that had a six position MTS selector had a wood block sound instead. In any case, it is working fine on my organ, but will probably not be used much.

    Dale Smith

  7. #7
    Moderator andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Newhaven, UK
    Posts
    8,486

    Thanks for completing the tale!

    Seems a really odd system to have auto arpeggios keyed from the pedals rather than the lower, but I suppose there were reasons for it.......
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com



    Current organ: Kawai SR6 + Leslie 760 Walnut
    Retired Organs: Lots! Including Hammond T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2012 Pacemaker. Kimball something-or-other.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145, 760, 710, 415 x 2.

  8. #8

    The only reason I can figure is that since the swinging fingers arpeggio always seems to be from the root position of the chord, it would be harder to identify the chord being played if it is played in an inverted position. As it is, if you do anything other than sit on the pedal, the arpeggio gets confused sounding. I always have trouble when the pedal seems to be doing things that I am not really connected to. Even though I may not use all these bells and whistles, I like knowing what they do.

  9. #9
    Moderator andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Newhaven, UK
    Posts
    8,486

    Possible, but organs have been recognising inverted chords for automatic functions since the early 1970s. I think Yamaha did it first, quickly followed by all the others. Baldwin's 'Fantom Fingers' was, I believe, the first auto arpeggio system, and I don't think that was inversion sensitive. The system they've used here seems odd, for the reason you've given - play anything other than a root pedal and it plays the wrong notes.
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com



    Current organ: Kawai SR6 + Leslie 760 Walnut
    Retired Organs: Lots! Including Hammond T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2012 Pacemaker. Kimball something-or-other.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145, 760, 710, 415 x 2.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-10-2012, 08:35 PM
  2. Orchestral Holiday Magic Genie Organ Value?
    By Sidz in forum How Much Is It Worth?
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-06-2010, 05:18 PM
  3. link to any DIY Leslie speed selector switches?
    By idealflaw in forum Electronic Organs
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-12-2009, 02:57 PM
  4. Electro Tone Preset Selector on M-3
    By Bails in forum Hammond Organs
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-22-2007, 02:26 AM
  5. Kimball K800 tone cabinet hook-up
    By everettorganist in forum Electronic Organs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-17-2005, 09:54 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •