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Thread: Lowrey 10L-2S connections

  1. #1

    Lowrey 10L-2S connections

    I was very fortunate in having been given a Lowrey 10L-2S tremolo unit. I've been trying to figure out the connections that go to the multi pin connector on the side. I see two wires(red and black)for the speaker and two wires each for each motor(this is a two speed unit). One wire from each motor goes to a separate pin where as the other wire from each motor go to a common pin. Is this common pin neutral and the separate pins for each motor are their respective hot leads for power?

    I want to use this with my M101 and I'm thinking about running the expression pedal out to an amplifier and then running that amplifier will run that speaker in the Lowrey. I would then use two switches in a project box, one to switch on the slow speed motor and the other to switch on the fast speed motor. Are the two motors powered from line(117VAC)voltage?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Senior Member jimmywilliams's Avatar
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    If this uses the 5-pin connector I think you are talking about, then yes you have it figured out. The motors do run on line AC (117V) - and yes as you can see one end of the AC for both motors would be tied together and the motor leads going to each separate pin would need to be switched. If you do wire these up to a polarized outlet, and are making a 5-pin interface, then wire the neutral (wide prong) side to the two motor wires that are joined together, and run the hot (narrow prong) side to your switches and to the respective motor pins. If you can find them, however, I would recommend a single-pole, double-throw switch so you can either switch to the slow motor OR the fast motor. If you use individual switches for each motor you must be extra careful that you never have both the fast and slow motors powered at the same time. Please note that in reality the motors themselves don't care which side of the AC goes where - they aren't polarized at all. It is just usually safer to put a switch on the hot side. If you use double-pole, double throw switch, then it really doesn't matter at all since you can switch BOTH sides that way. For safety I would also put a 1A fuse on the slow motor hot side, and a 1.5A fuse on the fast motor hot side (if your unit has the old-style motor stacks where the fast motor is bigger than the slow motor).
    Jimmy Williams
    Hobbyist (organist/technician)
    Gulbransen Model D with Leslie 204
    Farfisa Compact / Leslie 860 and Combo Preamp III / Hammond Porta-B

  3. #3

    You're right, a SPDT switch would make much more sense. It is indeed a 5 pin connector. I'll take some photos of the unit tomorrow. Fusing the hot side is always a good idea. I do a bit of work with vintage electronics, radios and amplifiers and big trouble can be caused by having a two fuse plug(fuse on both hot and neutral)with a blown neutral fuse as that can put some unpleasant voltages on the chassis. This must be one of the older varieties as the motors are stacked with the large motor sitting beneath the smaller one.

  4. #4
    Senior Member jdoc's Avatar
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    you may want to use a relay at 12 volts to do your switching to avoid high voltage out of the cabinet?
    I am slowly working out a 3 speed slow/stop/fast arrangement for a 130 Leslie I am making passive.
    I am using Bosch 40 amp headlight relays powered by a 12 volt wall wart.
    Only low voltage to the switch gear improves safety and reduces wire gauge and type considerably.. I just can't find the 12 volt wall wart, lots, of 5, 7.5, 18, 20 etc.
    You may need capacitors to avoid the dreaded Leslie POP switching noise.
    1956 M3, (2)51 Leslie under upgrade, 860 (130 powered)Leslie with Preamp, S08 Yamaha and two K2000S, Young Chang spinet,casio synth/clone, Roland VR700 clone and Korg SV-1 73
    Looking for that mythical cheap or free A, BV, CV, C2, C3 or A100 but wouldn't say no to a free B3

  5. #5

    Where would one mount the capacitors? Are you looking for an AC or DC adapter? There seem to be quite of a few of either on that famous auction site.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jimmywilliams's Avatar
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    These would be the line filter caps that go across the 2 sides of the AC for each motor. Nowadays use X2-rated safety capacitors. .01uF should be OK.
    Jimmy Williams
    Hobbyist (organist/technician)
    Gulbransen Model D with Leslie 204
    Farfisa Compact / Leslie 860 and Combo Preamp III / Hammond Porta-B

  7. #7

    Fantastic, I'll be sure to add them to the motors. Does anyone have any idea what wattage the speaker on the enclosure might be? It doesn't look to be that big so I'm not going to be putting more than 25 watts or so through it to start.

  8. #8
    Senior Member jimmywilliams's Avatar
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    You are on target there - 20-30 watts max. THere is a guy who sells these units on ebay and for a beefier speaker he recommends a seismic audio model - you can see the (now outdated) listing here where he describes in further detail: http://cgi.ebay.com/Leslie-Rotary-Sp...item2a1130de75
    If you want to use this with an organ with bass pedals though I would recommend you use a 12" speaker instead - search the threads on this forum for an Eminence full range speaker model with a whizzer cone recommended with a Leslie 25 or 125 - not sure of the model now.
    BUt in any case it should work fine for the most part as a passive speaker as-is with your Hammond spinet organ - but the bass pedals may be a problem.
    Let us know how you make out.
    Jimmy Williams
    Hobbyist (organist/technician)
    Gulbransen Model D with Leslie 204
    Farfisa Compact / Leslie 860 and Combo Preamp III / Hammond Porta-B

  9. #9

    I decided to have a bit of fun this evening and quickly put something together just to test the unit out. I ran the RCA out from my M-101's expression pedal to an Onkyo stereo receiver that I have. That receiver then fed the speaker in the Leslie unit directly. I wired up the slow speed motor and just let it run on. It sounds very very nice. This was definitely the missing link in what I was looking for sound wise. This, however, sounds fantastic. The built in speaker could use a little bit of help in accentuating the upper end of the Hammond's register but it isn't a problem. I plan to install a pass filter to roll off the low end and let the speaker concentrate more on reproducing the high end more. As I played I was continually reminded of the organ intro to Zeppelin's "Your Time Is Gonna Come" except with a bit of swirl to it.

    The speaker inside is a hardy one. I believe the Onkyo receiver I was using is good for a very conservatively rated 70 watts per channel and I was probably giving the speaker a good 45 watts to keep up with the internal speakers and amps on the M-101. I kept measure of the temperature of the speaker by placing my hand on the end bell. After an hour or so of playing it became a bit warm but nothing alarming at all.

    Next up is to install some 12VDC relays, put .01 caps across the motors and rig up a switching system. I would heartily recommend that if you are presented with the opportunity to acquire a "tremolo unit" from a Lowrey organ to do so, especially if it is a two speed unit. Don Leslie once mentioned that he experimented with all sorts of electronic phasing in hopes of trying to emulate the sound of a rotating speaker but in the end he admitted that the best solution was just to have that rotor spinning!

  10. #10

    I was wondering if anyone had any ideas as to the type of relay to use for this sort of project. I'm not well versed in the world of relays but I need a relay that can be switched by 12VDC but switches 120VAC.

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